• Global gaming industry worth AUD$125bn a year (July 2015)
  • Australian computer game development industry (“The Industry”) contributed AUD$2.46bn to the Australian economy
  • Australian Film & TV contributed AUD$5.8bn (February 2015)
  • The industry is expected to grow beyond AUD$3bn by 2017
  • The industry outperforms all other entertainment mediums but does not enjoy the same tax concessions/federal support
  • The AUD$20m Australian Interactive Game Fund (AIGF) was closed 12-months after establishment by the liberal government despite early signs of program success
  • Senate Inquiry due to report in April 2016 will table proposals for realising the greater economic opportunities from the industry (107 submissions were received)
  • Victoria is the game development capital of Australia (50% of the 200 commercial studios in Australia) helped by state funding program (Film Victoria) to assist with production and marketing
  • Australia was home to 6-10 large international studios successfully producing licensed games for major overseas publishers but high Australian dollar / GFC means that almost all have now closed (2K Australia in Canberra the last of the major studios to close)
  • Australia gaming industry now almost entirely homegrown/independent studios producing original intellectual, mostly for mobile platforms (phones, tablets etc)
  • Lack of finances and high running costs (eg wages) to support initial startup and subsequent growth to compete globally is a major factor holding back Australia development studios from realising global opportunity
  • There is no significant game development industry in Newcastle.  However, a Newcastle Chapter of the International Game Developers Association (IGDA) has been established and a community of excited programmers, artists and musicians is starting to grow.  The majority of respondents (8) to a recent survey (19 respondents) indicated they characterised themselves as hobbyist game developers.  Full-time / part-time independent game developers was represented well though (6).
  • Current independent developers include Mugshot Games (recently released the game “Digfender”), Ruxar (recently released the game “IZBOT”), Dream Well (recently released the app “Fit for Battle”) and Small Monsters Studio (soon to release the game “Leibniz”)
  • Active hobbyist game developers, including frequent participants in Game Jams, such as Chikun and DBTGAMES

 

 

Sources

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/technology/games-industry-hopes-to-push-right-buttons-with-politicians/story-e6frgakx-1227440485049

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